• Look up salary statistics. If you are well informed about statistics, it’s easier to know what would make a reasonable request. Many trade unions help their members with salary statistics, and also with training for salary negotiation. You can also use Statistics Sweden (Statistiska centralbyrån), and information from the workplace's collective agreement. Find out as much about the position as possible, so that you know what the salary corresponds to in actual work. If the workplace has a union contact, ask them about reasonable salary.
  • Sharpen your arguments. Your arguments should be factual and based on your skills, the difficulty and responsibilities of the job, and how well you meet the requirements.
  • Do not include a salary claim in your application. Sometimes you are required to include a salary claim in your application. Write instead that you would like to hear more about the content and terms of the job before you state a salary claim. The later you talk salary, the better. Try to wait until you got the job. Then you know more and can prepare arguments. You also have a better negotiation position, since the employer now has showed that he or she wants you for the job.
  • Your bid. Set it a little higher than you would accept, in case the employer should lower it. Also, decide on a lower limit.
  • Benefits. In addition to the salary, there is a lot of other things which might be subject to negotiation - especially if there is no collective agreement – and which might compensate for lower pay: overtime compensation, extra holiday, flexible working hours, insurance, health care, occupational retirement, competence development.